Rethinking humane indicators of excellence in the humanities and social sciences

Tag: values

Community as a Humanistic Value

Community as a Humanistic Value

Today is the Day Two of the Triangle Scholarly Communication Institute, where I’m heading up a team that’s focusing on HuMetrics: Building Humane Metrics for the Humanities. Our team has focused a lot on the importance of working out loud, of process over product, and […]

On Openness

On Openness

Second day at #TriangleSCI with the #HuMetrics team. Today we focused on clustering our values into major value-categories (Equity, Openness, Collegiality, Quality, and Community) with the idea that excellence in scholarship is an expression and combination of these value-categories as they are embodied in scholarly […]

Equity as a Core Value

Equity as a Core Value

We’ve just completed Day 2 at #TriangleSCI, and more hard (but good) work is now behind the #HuMetrics team. Today we took our huge brainstorming list from yesterday and distilled the values we believe should underpin the development of “humane metrics.” We came up with five such values: Equity, Openness, Collegiality, Quality, and Community. I am looking here at equity. My fellow teammates Simone Sacchi, Chris Long, Jason Rhody, and Nicky Agate are tackling each of the others, and Stacy Konkiel is writing on the overarching question we looked to tackle: influence vs. impact.

What do we mean by “equity”? For us, equity is very much the concept described by Falk et al. (1993:2):

“Equity derives from a concept of social justice. It represents a belief that there are some things which people should have, that there are basic needs that should be fulfilled, that burdens and rewards should not be spread too divergently across the community, and that policy should be directed with impartiality, fairness and justice towards these ends.”

In the academy, valuing the principle of equity can (and we would argue should) inflect a number of everyday activities: creating courses, advising and mentoring students (and colleagues), organizing conferences, facilitating workshops, appointing or serving on search committees and editorial boards  —  and so much more. The results of embracing work done in the spirit of achieving an equitable academy? We want to imagine a world in which all who partake in teaching, learning, reading, researching, and writing  —  in short, all of us engaged in the scholarly enterprise  —  commit to actively listen and to openly question our own assumptions, to share, to amplify, and ultimately to empower.

Equality, Equity, No Barriers
Source: http://sydney.edu.au/science/physics/about/equity.shtml (Adapted from http://indianfunnypicture.com)

Follow team #HuMetrics as we wrestle with humanities metrics. We are Christopher Long, Rebecca Kennison, Stacy Konkiel, Simone Sacchi, Jason Rhody, and Nicky Agate, and we’ll be writing here all week.

Influence vs. Impact: Which Are Humanists Really Trying to Achieve?

Influence vs. Impact: Which Are Humanists Really Trying to Achieve?

Apologies for the false dichotomy I’ve set up by my framing of this post in its title as “impact versus influence.” It’s a result of the quickblogging process, one that Christopher Long, Rebecca Kennison, Nicky Agate, Simone Sacchi, Jason Rhody, and I agreed upon as […]

The Value of Openness

The Value of Openness

Day 1 of the Triangle Scholarly Communication Institute is underway, and our HuMetrics: Building Humane Metrics for the Humanities team (Nicky Agate, Simone Sacchi, Christopher Long, Stacy Konkiel, Jason Rhody, and me) is already hard at work. We began by putting aside (for the moment) […]

HuMetrics Values

HuMetrics Values

Today is the first day of the Triangle Scholarly Communication Institute, where I’m heading up a team that’s focusing on HuMetrics: Building Humane Metrics for the Humanities. Our team has focused a lot on the importance of working out loud, of process over product, and agreed that we would each take 20 minutes once or twice a day to blog, pomodoro style, about what we’ve been up to. In other words, don’t expect polished prose; this is pre-alpha humetrics-in-the-making.

One of the things we’re trying to do is work out what should be valued in humanities scholarship, which is in part about what could count toward tenure and promotion of course, but is much more importantly about what our resident philosopher (Christopher Long) told us the ancient Greeks called arete, or excellence in practice. What are the values that would enrich and improve humanities scholarship? (The idea being that later this week, we’ll be able to answer such questions as, “How can humanists’ practices better reflect those values?” and “What kind of incentive/metrics system would encourage humanities scholars to embody those practices?”)

What are we missing? Which values should we embody in our practice to enrich humanities scholarship?

Follow team #HuMetrics as we wrestle with humanities metrics. We are Christopher Long, Rebecca Kennison, Stacy Konkiel, Simone Sacchi, Jason Rhody, and Nicky Agate, and we’ll be writing here all week.

Enriching vs. Corrosive Values in Academia

Enriching vs. Corrosive Values in Academia

As part of the TriangleSCI HuMetrics working group, I spent the better part of this afternoon brainstorming and debating academic values, products, processes, and metrics in an attempt to lay a foundation for this week’s attempt at articulating “humane metrics” for the humanities. As our […]

From Metrics to Values

From Metrics to Values

Recognizing that metrics drive practices in the academy (and elsewhere), we on the HuMetrics: Building a Humane Metrics for the Humanities team at this year’s Triangle Scholarly Communications Institute decided to approach our work by thinking first about the values that inform enriching scholarship. This […]


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